Tag Archive for fishing

Celebrating a Seafaring Centenary!

Alex Whitaker – Senior Account Executive

Did you know that 95 per cent of Britain’s imports come via the sea? Or that the fishing industry contributes more than €70 billion to the European economy every year? As an island nation, our reliance on the sea cannot be underestimated, yet too often we all take for granted just how many people work in this challenging environment – and just how much they do for the rest of us.

Well, this week sees the return of Seafarers Awareness Week (24 – 30 June), the annual celebration of all things maritime and a reminder of the thousands of people toiling away to keep us stocked up on fish, fuel and all the other goods we rely on!

In its centenary year, Seafarers UK has again organised Seafarers Awareness Week, this time with a focus on promoting UK maritime employment opportunities, including shore based jobs (a quarter of a million jobs in Britain are supported by the maritime sector!)

At Acceleris, Seafarers Awareness Week is always a busy time for our specialist maritime team. This year, we’re working with the Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society on their annual open day, with Nautilus International on the recent launch of a report into crew communications at sea and with the Shipwrecked Mariners Society on the launch of their annual photography competition.

Earlier this year, our editorial division, Writers Inc., produced Seafarers UK commemorative anniversary publication which involved delving through the archives, copywriting and project management.

To help celebrate the charity’s 100 years, we’ve put together a 100-strong maritime trivia list! Why not take a look below to see what you already knew… or found out something completely new!

 

  1. How much does the fishing industry contribute to the European economy each year?
    • €71.3 billion
  2. What percentage of Europeans eat fish at least once a week?
    • 70 per cent
  3. Which five species of seafood are most popular with UK consumers, amounting to 70 per cent of all sales?
    • Cod, Haddock, Salmon, Tuna and Prawns
  4. How many kilogrammes of fish do British adults eat every week?
    • 8 million
  5. How much does the shipping industry contribute to the global economy?
    • £327 billion
  6. How many jobs in the UK are supported by the maritime sector?
    • 250,000
  7. How many tonnes of fish do British vessels catch every year?
    • 700,000
  8. How many fishermen are there in the UK?
    • 12,000
  9. Approximately, how many species of fish are there in the world?
    • 27,000
  10. What proportion of Britain’s imports come in via the sea?
    • 95 per cent
  11. Women make up what percentage of worldwide seafarers?
    • 2 per cent
  12. How many bananas could the largest container ship in the world hold?
    • 745 million
  13. Since 1975, the number of British seafarers has fallen by how much?
    • 75 per cent
  14. How many seafarers are employed by the global industry?
    • 5 million
  15. Seafarers from which nation make up one third of all shipworkers?
    • The Philippines
  16. At any one moment, how many containers are at sea?
    • 20 million
  17. How much of international trade does shipping account for?
    • 90 per cent
  18. Whilst at sea, ships occasionally encounter ‘growlers’, what exactly are growlers?
    • Small icebergs (so named because of the nose made as the ship’s hull scrapes past them)
  19. The deepest part of any ocean in the world is an area of the Pacific Ocean with a depth of 36,161 ft., what name is given to this area?
    • Mariana Trench
  20. What species of fish produces the most eggs?
    • Ocean Sunfish (Mola mola)
  21. How many varieties of goldfish are there?
    • Over 100
  22. What is the fastest fish?
    • Sailfish
  23. In the movie, Finding Nemo, what kind of fish is Nemo?
    • Clownfish
  24. What is the largest species of fish?
    • Whale Shark
  25. What is the smallest species of fish?
    • Stout Infantfish
  26. How many teeth can a shark grow during its lifetime?
    • 50,000
  27. How many portions of fish and chips do UK consumers eat every year?
    • 382 million
  28. How many eggs do salmon lay a year?
    • 2000-5000
  29. What was the name of the ship captained by Captain Hook (From Peter Pan)
    • Jolly Roger
  30. Name the ship Christopher Columbus captained on his first voyage to the new world?
    • Santa Maria
  31. Who captained the RMS Titanic?
    • Edward John Smith
  32. Name the ship captained by Ernest Shackleton on his Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917
    • Endurance
  33. In which war was the convoy system introduced?
    • World War One
  34. How many ballistic missiles can a Vanguard class carry?
    • 16
  35. Which naval station is responsible for arming all submarines?
    • Coulport
  36. Which Royal Naval base is said to be the largest in Western Europe?
    • Devonport
  37. What is the professional head of the Royal Navy’s’ title?
    • First Sea Lord
  38. Who was in the “Wavy Navy”?
    • Members of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve
  39. How many ships are in the Royal Navy?
    • 77
  40. When was the Royal Navy founded?
    • 1546
  41. What was the name of the first submarine to surface at the North Pole in 1959?
    • Skate
  42. What is the name of the American submarine that sank itself with its own torpedo in October 1944?
    • Tang
  43. Who invented the first submarine?
    • David Bushnell
  44. What was the first submarine named?
    • Turtle
  45. What do the initials ULCC as a size of tanker stand for?
    • Ultra Large Crude Carrier
  46. What is a common use of a RORO vessel?
    • Car Carrying Ferry
  47. What is a tanker of between 120,000 and 180,000 deadweight tons size called?
    • Suezmax Size
  48. What is the overall term used to describe the different types of rope used on a vessel?
    • Cordage
  49. When facing forwards what is the left side of a ship called?
    • Port
  50. What is navigation by stars called?
    • Celestial navigation
  51. What is the name of the person in charge of mechanical issues aboard a ship?
    • Chief Engineer
  52. If you were in the toilets of a ship, where would you be?
    • Heads
  53. What is the acronym for the electronic positioning system used by seamen?
    • GPS
  54. What do commercial fisherman throw to the sea for good luck while fishing?
    • Canned Food
  55. What day is said to be bad luck for seaman to leave the harbour?
    • Friday
  56. What two words are used to define coordinates?
    • Latitude and longitude
  57. What was the name of the famous ship that sailed in 1620 to North America to establish a new colony?
    • Mayflower
  58. What was the name of the famous ship that hit an iceberg in 1912?
    • Titanic
  59. What type of fish is a skipjack?
    • Tuna
  60. Tinca Tinca is the Latin name for which fish?
    • Tench
  61. What is a young Pilchard called?
    • Sardine
  62. What colour are the spots on plaice?
    • Red/Orange
  63. Alevin and parr are stages in the development of which fish?
    • Salmon
  64. What family does the anchovy belong to?
    • Herring
  65. Where is a fish’s caudal fin?
    • Tail
  66. What are the whiskers on catfish and other bottom dwellers called?
    • Barbels
  67. How many types of catfish are there?
    • Over 2,000
  68. What fish has enough poison to kill 30 people?
    • Puffer Fish
  69. What fish can regrow body parts?
    • Starfish
  70. Which fish’s home is poisonous to other animals?
    • Clown Anemonefish
  71. Which species is often referred to as a carpet shark?
    • Tasselled Wobbegong
  72. Name a relative of the seahorse?
    • Ornate Ghost Pipefish
  73. Which fish can move overland between waters?
    • Eel
  74. What is a recently hatched fish called?
    • A fry
  75. What is the fastest fish in the ocean?
    • Sailfish
  76. Which fish migrates the furthest?
    • European Eel
  77. How far can flying fish glide in the air?
    • 20 feet or more
  78. Why are fish often covered in slime?
    • Helps them move quickly through water
  79. Are jellyfish and crayfish actually fish?
    • No
  80. How long can a goldfish live in captivity?
    • 30 years or more
  81. What kind of fish is Dory in Finding Nemo?
    • Blue Tang Fish
  82. What percentage of the world’s fish live in freshwater?
    • 40%
  83. Do fish have eyelids?
    • No
  84. Which state in America catches the most fish?
    • Alaska
  85. The red drum is what type of fish?
    • Bottom feeder
  86. Which shark is flat like a stingray?
    • Pacific Angel Shark
  87. What ocean dwelling creature doesn’t have any support for its body but its muscles?
    • Squid
  88. What ocean dwelling create squirts toxic ink?
    • Cuttlefish
  89. What type of snapper is the largest?
    • Red Snapper
  90. What fish is known as the silver king?
    • Tarpon
  91. Which body is responsible for issuing recreational fishing licences in England and Wales?
    • Environment Agency
  92. What fish is also known as the Lady of the Stream?
    • Grayling
  93. Which is the most common species of carp in British waters?
    • Mirror
  94. What is a water dwelling insect larva?
    • A Nymph
  95. How are Sewin known as in the UK?
    • Sea Trout
  96. Which fish is also known as the Doctor Fish?
    • Tench
  97. Fishing from a free-drifting boat is what type of fly-fishing method?
    • Loch Style
  98. What proportion of UK seafarers are completely without internet connection?
    • 4 per cent
  99. What proportion of UK seafarers have access to social media at sea?
    • 34 per cent
  100. What proportion of UK seafarers have access to personal emails at sea?
    • 57 per cent

David Bushnell and the world’s first submarine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skipjack or yellowfin tuna?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fastest fish on the planet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Found Dory!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acceleris is a specialist in award winning communications for maritime industry. Why not take a look at some of our recent work in the sector and see if we can help get your communications afloat?

Fishing for Leadership in 2017

Ben Rowe – Account Executive

Most people would agree 2016 played host to a seismic shift in world politics. With Article 50 on the verge of being triggered, people from all walks of life are wondering what the future holds for them in post-Brexit Britain. Not least, the fishing industry.

You may think the challenges facing commercial fishing are well established. For example, fishing holds the longstanding title of ‘most dangerous occupation in the world’ with the fatal accident rate over 100 times that of the general workforce in the UK.

Additionally, fishing is an industry we are heavily reliant on and has rich historical ties with our island nation. Around 80% of us consume seafood at least once a month and the UK fishing industry remains crucially important to many coastal towns.

Criticism, however, is never far away. Organisations such as Greenpeace have run regular sensationalist campaigns condemning the effects of fishing, including excess bycatch, discards, diminishing stocks, environmental damage and animal welfare.

 

Source: BBC

 

 

External pressures are only going to add to an already turbulent discussion. Brexit negotiations throw quotas and the jurisdiction of waters up in the air, making the future for fishermen particularly hazy.

In January, Prime Minister Theresa May came under attack from UK fishermen for ‘betraying’ them when outlining the government’s plans for the negotiations with the EU after the triggering of Article 50. In a Brexit speech at Westminster, May was deemed to have failed to address the future of UK fisheries and the relationship with the rest of Europe once ties are cut on Union membership. Fears about fishing being used as a ‘bargaining chip’ in negotiations only served to raise the stakes for a proud industry which MEP Mike Hookem believes could be a ‘shot in the arm’ for the country post-Brexit.

This new political environment and subsequent change does, however, present an opportunity to those within the fishing industry. Customers will be looking for reliability, consistency and stability among the uncertainty. With strong communications there is the chance to be a leading light in what may appear an uncertain time. Building a strong media presence can position you as the voice of the industry. It is perhaps not a time to rock the boat, as being consistent and reliable can breed confidence and trust.

Currently, 66% of UK fish exports go to the EU, meaning tariff-free or low-tariff trade could be vital to Britain in the coming years. Brexit will mean the UK leaves the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and gains the right under international law to control who fishes within its waters.

Whilst many see the UK’s impending release from EU ties as positive for the fishing industry, there are warnings to be considered. The CFP is a taboo topic in many industry circles and whilst ‘taking back control’ of British waters is a popular mantra, those working in fisheries will have to act smartly to ensure any potential freedom is enjoyed responsibly.

 

Source: Press Association

 

 

These concerns, and more, highlight the need for communications to be carefully managed and balanced with good practice to maintain successful operations within fishing companies. If companies show good preparation in their handling of the media and act first, fast and frank in the case of an incident, it can put them on the front foot rather than relying on reactionary measures.

Acceleris has worked with the National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations (NFFO) since 2013, landing six awards in the process, at both national and European level.

Just days after starting work with the NFFO, we established an integrated crisis communications plan when they came up against a direct attack from Greenpeace, coinciding with ground-breaking European legislation change and a protest lobby led by TV chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. From a standing start, Acceleris achieved five of seven annual objectives in the first month, landing 88 pieces of coverage (89% positive), 135 million positive opportunities to see and laid the foundations for a much higher media profile, including coverage on Newsnight and in The Times.

We have since challenged misconceptions about the fishing industry through campaigns such as ‘Let Them Eat Hake’, the championing of Britain’s most sustainable fish, in 2014. Through a radio day, celebrity endorsements, hake tasting sessions attended by opinion formers and the use of video, the celebration of sustainability changed the conversation from concerns about overfishing, generating significant positive coverage across media platforms over a prolonged period.

We have the experience and expertise to make a difference from the get-go.

Challenges to fishing are not going to go away in a hurry. The balance between operating successfully at a financial level and maintaining responsibility is a difficult one to manage. If you need support steering through these turbulent times, we are here to help. Give us a call today on 0845 4567 251 or send an email to ellies@acceleris-mc.com.

Keeping your reputation ship shape

Crucial in any industry – but why especially so for fishing?

The fishing industry has come in for a lot of undue criticism over the last few years, with NGOs, politicians, journalists and campaigners all lining up to take a swipe. Many of these attacks can be characterised as sweeping statements backed by precious little factual evidence. Yet, attacks like these, even when founded on incorrect allegations, can cause serious damage to a company’s, or an entire industry’s, reputation. Therefore it is crucial that reputation management is seen as a necessary element of running your business and keeping it shipshape.

Recent research from BDO LLP and the Quoted Companies Alliance has shown small and medium sized companies attach 28 per cent of their value directly to reputation. With the UK fishing industry valued at more than £860m[1], that’s clearly quite a significant amount. As the fishing industry comes in for constant and heavy scrutiny, far more so than many other industries, one misstep can have severe consequences.

So just how serious an impact can a badly managed crisis have? When thinking about reputation meltdown and its impact on business value, a recent example that comes to mind is that of Volkswagen. The company lost over a third of its value (35 per cent) in just two days following the ‘dieselgate’ crisis where the company was found to be using cheat devices during emissions tests. That’s a hit of approximately €25bn.

The emergence of a crisis is sometimes completely unavoidable. What we remain in control of, however, is the response. Thankfully this is by far the most important aspect of ensuring reputations remain untarnished. It’s not too much to say that a well-crafted response to a crisis can be the difference between a short term nuisance and a permanently damaged reputation.

Our advice would be to ensure you’re first, fast and frank in your response to the issue. By being proactive in taking control of your response to customers, employees, suppliers, wider stakeholders and the media, you can set the tone for how it’s perceived down the line. If you’re seen to be addressing the situation seriously with a joined up plan across all your communications channels you can actually improve rather than damage the perception of your business.

It sounds easy when you put it like that, but to swiftly and effectively manage a crisis you need to have a plan in place long before you can see a potential issue looming on the horizon. By having a procedure clearly laid out for dealing with any problems, you’ll ensure your response is professional and level-headed. This includes identifying all operational responsibilities to communicating your plan of action – with digital media now being at the forefront of any crisis strategy.

However, reputation management is not all about deflecting crises. Proactively promoting a consistent, positive message about a business and its operations can be a brilliant boost to a business’ reputation and pays dividends in ensuring any negative issues are placed in the context of a much wider, positive piece.

The Saucy Fish Company recently won plaudits and a prestigious award for its School of Fish campaign, which saw a team of children prepare, cook and serve Saucy Fish products to a packed central London restaurant. By planning such a creative event, along with the inevitable cuteness factor brought by kids, the company pulled off a great stunt which led to substantial positive feedback – and the approval and increased interest of potential customers.

At Acceleris, we recently ran a proactive campaign of our own to dispel some of the myths surrounding the European fishing industry, communicating a more positive, consumer-friendly face for the sector. Working with Europêche, the European trade body representing 80,000 fishermen and 45,000 vessels from nine EU countries, Acceleris developed the consumer information portal iFish, designed to address the growing consumer appetite for information on the industry. The site provides facts and figures on the industry while boosting its favourability in the eyes of the public. The associated campaign secured almost 200 pieces of press coverage across Europe, reaching an audience of 140 million people. Every piece of coverage contained a positive message about the work of the industry and the campaign beat global brands including BP, BASF and Unilever to the European Excellence Award in Communications in Stockholm last December.

Clearly, the fishing industry has made good headway in recent years on improving its reputation and it’s great to see sympathetic programmes like The Catch and Trawlermen Tales hitting the mainstream. On the back of this, it’s brilliant to see the Fishing News Awards return after an eight year break. The awards, set to be held in Aberdeen on 26 May 2016, will celebrate the best commercial fishermen from across the UK and Ireland. With a fantastic buzz already surrounding the awards, this kind of event is exactly what the industry needs to capitalise, and improve even further, on its recent reputation boost.

Of course, everyday activity is crucial too – managing reputation is a continuing job. Most businesses don’t have the resources to put on a constant stream of events of this scale – likewise, it’s not simply enough to start trying to garner good favour once a crisis is already on your plate. Regularly share good news stories and CSR initiatives so people know the good work your business does. Not only is this good practice generally, it may determine how people react if a crisis does hit your company. It will also help you to develop strong relationships within the media which are useful to promote good news, but could also become handy when you have not-so good news to share.

The UK fishing industry provides over 31,000 jobs[2], almost £1bn to the economy and food security to the nation and abroad. Yet, these positive messages are in danger of becoming drowned out by well financed and well-resourced detractors. It’s time the industry took back the narrative and restored fishermen’s position as the heroes of the seas.

[1] The value of the 756,000 tonnes of sea fish landed by UK vessels into the UK and abroad.

[2] There are 11,800 active fishermen and 19,511 fish processors in the UK as of 2014

Seafood Week Part 1: It’s Of-fish-al! National Seafood Week is here!

In factories, plants and sites across the country, there are signs proudly announcing the number of days the company has gone without accidents.

On the wall of the Acceleris office however, there is a sign saying:

 

fish 1

This is because today is Fish Pun Day! Wahoo! (actually a fishy member of the mackerel family for those who don’t know). In an office full of people who love words and language, it’s easy to get carried away with pun one-upmanship, but finally CEO and head punster, Peter, is free to say ‘oh my cod’ or ‘plain sailing from here’ or ‘right plaice, right time’. I would go on but just thinking about it is giving me a haddock…!

Fish Pun Day marks the start of National Seafood Week (9-16th October) and we, at Acceleris, are getting ‘on board’ to share some of our ‘brill’ experiences working with fishermen and seafarers.

Over the next week, members of the agency’s maritime division will be sharing their experiences of working in the maritime and fishing sectors. We will also be busy on Twitter using the hashtags #Gethooked, and #SeafoodWeek to share ideas, videos and examples of our work so raise the periscope.

fish 2

fish 3From royal visits to a retired seafarers’ care home and dunking celebrities in shark tanks to defending hardworking fishermen and championing sustainability, Acceleris’ maritime work in the last two years alone has taken the team to Munich, Dublin, Brussels, London, Vigo, and of course closer to home trips to Grimsby and Hull! Some of our award winning fishy work has also been studied by students at the University of the Arts London.

 

So get ‘on board’ and ‘set sail’ for a week of insight and top tips for communications for the maritime industry. Oh and don’t forget buoys and gills, if you can think of a batter fish pun, let minnow!