Tag Archive for editorial

The key to cereal success?

Katie Wadsworth - Copywriter / Account Executive, Acceleris

Katie Wadsworth – Copywriter / Account Executive

On Monday 4th July, cereal giant Kellogg’s opened its first ever restaurant in New York’s Times Square. While it may seem a little strange to open a café dedicated to cereal, Kellogg’s is not the first, with similar outfits including the Cereal Killer Café in Camden and Brick Lane, London. Both businesses are capitalising on the experience economy which has evolved from the modern consumer’s desire to interact with brands and experience something which is, ultimately, Instagram worthy.

Kellogg’s is not the first brand to tap into the experience economy; other companies include Magnum which has created a series of ‘pleasure stores’ where customers can craft their perfect Magnum from a variety of indulgent toppings, and Italian fashion house Armani, which has its own luxury hotels in Milan and Dubai.

Magnum London

Source: Magnum

The move by the cereal giant to open a café comes as it was recently revealed that in the past 15 years, cereal sales have fallen by almost 30 per cent*. Cereal companies are often vilified for producing products containing too much sugar, fat and salt, and now they are struggling to impress a cynical, health-conscious audience.

Once considered the only breakfast option, and a fast one at that, cereal is no longer quick enough to keep up with our busy lives, with consumers favouring breakfast bars or yoghurt which they can transport more easily. Almost 40 per cent of millennials surveyed by Mintel* also said cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to clean up after eating it!

Kellogg’s has engaged top American chef, Christina Tosi, to devise new recipes from the home favourite cereals, including creations such as ‘Pistachio & Lemon’ (spiked Frosted Flakes and Special K) and ‘The Circus’ (Raisin Bran, peanuts and banana chips). Andrew Shripka, associate director of brand marketing at Kellogg’s, said: “We could have put a great recipe on the box. But this is much more powerful.”

‘Milk-based creations’ on display at Kellogg’s New York. Photograph: Brendan McDermid/Reuters

‘Milk-based creations’ on display at Kellogg’s New York. Photograph: Brendan McDermid/Reuters

It appears the company didn’t want to just stage a PR stunt – although the opening has been covered by everyone from Reuters, to The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian – instead they are trying to encourage consumers to experiment and look at cereal as a dining event rather than a mundane experience. Each customer also gets a free toy, which goes some way to recapturing the joy of childhood!

Tapping into the experience economy is a good way for companies to engage with their consumers, and while it may initially be the novelty factor which will draw people in to the café, the space will serve an important function for Kellogg’s in the long term. Other brands that have set up cafés, for example Chobani – an American yoghurt brand which opened a café in New York in 2012 – has seen its café double in size since opening, with sales growing annually by 40 per cent.

Chobani’s New York café has also served as a place for the company to try out new items and a number of new product lines, including a range of mezze dips, have been created following customer feedback and trials.

So while the venture may seem a little surreal at first mention, the Kellogg’s Times Square café could breathe new life into the brand and perhaps even become a cereal success!

Acceleris is no stranger to launching brands and has helped many companies – from local confectioners to large third sector organisations – build and maintain their reputations, both in the UK and worldwide. For more information on our credentials, take a look at our website.

*Mintel report, 2015

An Evening With Leeds University’s History Makers

150

The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society 150th Anniversary book ‘Home from Sea’

“You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift.”
― Erin Morgenstern, The Night Circus

It’s been a constant source of disquiet for me that our brightest, youngest, most vital minds are sold the fallacy that the world is a barren wasteland of opportunity, with a paucity of enterprise and scant pickings, even for those who achieve straight A’s.

Such is the power of stories.

As someone who has never been out of work since age eight (family business making deliveries on a butcher’s bike) and who most definitely wasn’t a straight A student, I thought it was time to get out amongst our city’s young folk and learn for myself what was happening today.

During my time at the inward investment agency for Leeds City Region, I’d been privileged to hear from some truly inspirational leaders, from the emerging fields of fintech and med tech through to chief executives, operations managers, systems designers and many doctors, scientists, security experts and entrepreneurs. All of them confirmed the need for capable millennials in all sectors.

During my five years with HSBC Bank, I’d also seen inside numerous UK businesses and whether they were based in thriving metropolises or declining mill towns, they still relied on a pipeline of talent to help them achieve their business plans. I’ve always seen a glut of opportunity and plenty of need for workers to drive our economy, but with many of our jobs only coming into existence in the last five or ten years as digital disruption takes hold and transforms what we know, what skills do graduates need to fit in? And why are some graduates still keen to qualify in history?

When a colleague passed me the invitation to the History Society Careers Networking Dinner at Leeds University, I initially thought ‘what skills would history graduates have that we’d need here at Acceleris? Quickly followed by ‘what has history got to do with Public Relations?’ The answer to me quickly became ‘everything’.

At Acceleris, we deal in stories and use the power of a good story well told, to change opinions, win funding, stop hospitals from closing, fight misinformation and stop unsustainable practices. One of our most saleable skills is our detailed knowledge of the past and our ability to analyse the media and economic landscape to spot and tap into future trends and issues.

History is in our taxonomy and how we relate topics, themes and people to each other. Recently we’ve been appointed as project archivist for one of the UK’s oldest maritime charities, The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society. A role which required not only the conservation and cataloguing of images from 150 years of history, but also the authoring and preservation of a cherished story that would be told for years to come in a commemorative 106 page book produced by our Writers Inc. division.

The painstaking research and ability to deal with the minutiae of people’s personal memories, tall tales or vague reminiscences and the physical evidence had everything to do with the skills history graduates learn.

It’s the same with rapid fire news, features or copywriting, which are all based on the ability to listen and understand and to relate those pieces of information to the wider world, giving things context and meaning.

In addition to learning from a syllabus packed with relevant skills, the quality of the student-organised event I attended was also outstanding. The sit down dinner and the round-table approach, where local companies such as Deloitte, Irwin Mitchell and Teach First hosted around eight students each, showed a real razor-sharp insight into delivering the outcomes the group was looking for – so placements, internships and ultimately, employment.

prologue

The prologue to The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society 150th Anniversary book ‘Home from Sea’

These history graduates have certainly taken charge of writing their own life stories.

Seafood Week Part 3: Helping maritime organisations at their best, look their best

When I started work at Acceleris nearly seven years ago (as of next month) little could I have imagined that this would be the beginning of a professional and personal interest of mine in all things maritime.

The irony of our HQ being in one of the most central and landlocked areas of the UK, has often been commented upon. But location has never been a barrier to us becoming one of the leading maritime communications and PR specialists in the country. As my colleague Ellie St George-Yorke said in her latest blog, our maritime sector work has seen us travel extensively and win our firstpan-European client.39-Two residents on the Royal Eagle (Day trip steamer) on the Thames-1934 or 1935

As the Head of Writers Inc., the agency’s dedicated editorial project division, I am very proud of the work the team has done in the maritime industry across the public, private and third sectors. Whatever the client, we help to raise awareness of this country’s connection and dependence on the sea and the extraordinary people who work in sea-related trades.

 

To mark Seafish’s National Seafood Week, I wanted to take the opportunity to showcase some of the editorial projects, online and offline, Acceleris has undertaken for maritime clients. We are open to any brief and will always advise on the best platform and content for their audience and needs; ensure value for money; and work with the best suppliers to get the job done. Our work has so far encompassed:

  • Websites and microsites
  • A commemorative book
  • Info graphics
  • Annual reports
  • Leaflets, presentation folders and other marketing collateral and stationery
  • Social media campaigns.

There are too many from the last seven years to mention here, so I’ve chosen my three favourite, but very different Acceleris editorial projects in this sector to date:ifish

  • iFish – dispelling fishing industry myths on behalf of European trade body Europêche

PROJECT TYPE: Interactive microsite including innovative Fish Facts info graphic

LAUNCHED: April 2015

PEOPLE HAVE SAID: “I’ve looked at iFish and to be quite honest, I think it’s amazing, very well constructed and just the sort of thing we’ve been waiting for, to help promote and portray a real-time picture of the industry in light of so much pressure and negative press.”-Member of the public

SEE FOR YOURSELF…

 

  • Home From Sea – 150 years of The Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society 150

PROJECT TYPE: Commemorative hardback history book

PUBLISHED: July 2015

PEOPLE HAVE SAID: “I am immensely pleased and proud of the book, which met and surpassed our expectations. Since the launch event we have had some verygood feedback from residents, relatives, staff, partner organisations and other external sources. No one could fail to like it and be impressed. We have a book of which we can be justifiably proud and a fitting tribute to the Royal Alfred.” – Commander Brian Boxall-Hunt MBE, Chief Executive of the Society

The first reaction of HRH The Princess Royal, on receiving the first copy of the book as the charity’s Patron, was: “Good title!”

SEE FOR YOURSELF…

 

  • shipwreckedmariners.org.uk

PROJECT TYPE: Charity website raising awareness of its work providing vital financial aid to mariners in need

LAUNCHED: June 2011shipwrecked web

PEOPLE SAID: I just wanted to thank you for all your work and the help you’ve given us to ensure we have a modern website to be proud of.” Stephen Fisher, Marketing & Communications Manager at the Society

SEE FOR YOURSELF…

 

You can see many more examples on our website www.acceleris-mc.com

If you have a need for a printed publication, website, microsite, or something completely different, please get in touch.

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